Villa Petschek Story | Exhibition

When: 05.09.2019 - 08.10.2019
Where:  Americké centrum, Tržiště 13, Praha 1 – Malá Strana
Admission: 

free


Main image

Villa Petschek in Prague’s Bubeneč district currently serves as the U.S. Ambassador’s residence. If its walls could talk, its history would recount all of the major moments of the 20th century.

Wealthy banker Otto Petschek equipped it with luxurious furnishings and modern technology when he built it in the 20´s. A glass wall can be lowered underground is comparable to that at the famous Villa Tugendhat in Brno, on the UNESCO world heritage list.  The Jewish Petschek family fled the residence in 1938, after which it was seized during World War II by Rudolf Toussaint, Chief Commander of the German Army in Prague.  After the war, it was used by the Soviet Army and the Czechoslovak Ministry of National Defense.  In September 1945, the U.S. Ambassador rented the villa and arranged for its purchase as the official U.S. Ambassador’s residence. Under communism, many U.S. ambassadors hosted events with Czechoslovak dissidents, including Václav Havel.  Wealthy banker Otto Petschek equipped it with luxurious furnishings and modern technology when he built it in the 20´s. A glass wall can be lowered underground is comparable to that at the famous Villa Tugendhat in Brno, on the UNESCO world heritage list.  The Jewish Petschek family fled the residence in 1938, after which it was seized during World War II by Rudolf Toussaint, Chief Commander of the German Army in Prague.  After the war, it was used by the Soviet Army and the Czechoslovak Ministry of National Defense.  In September 1945, the U.S. Ambassador rented the villa and arranged for its purchase as the official U.S. Ambassador’s residence. Under communism, many U.S. ambassadors hosted events with Czechoslovak dissidents, including Václav Havel.  Come enjoy unique photographs dating from the time when it was built, and to see images of the grand halls that are rarely open to the public.